Selected Obituaries from Local Newspapers

The following selected obituaries were contributed by Jeanene Daniels on 8 Mar 2000

 

September 30, 1893 Florence Times

 

Murder in Hardin County --- On Friday of last week Jack Shelby of Hardin County, TN was arrested a few miles west of Florence by a posse from his neighborhood. The fugitive a day or two previously had killed a neighbor named D. S. Lay, near Savannah. The two young men had had hot words and separated. They afterwards met when Shelby seized a piece of wood and struck Lay on the head, felling him to the ground. He started for a physician, but hearing that Lay had died from the blow, Shelby took to the woods. At the time of the arrest the sheriff of Hardin Co. was in Florence, having come here to intercept Shelby.

 

September 21, 1895 Florence Times

 

Chisholm Butler, Sr. - This Well Known Citizen Passes Away
Mr. Chisholm Butler, Sr., one of the oldest and most widely known citizens of our county, died at his home near Centre Star on Sunday night last, aged about 75 years. The cause of his death was an affection of the brain, - congestion or brain fever - and his sickness was of short duration, only eight or ten days.
Thus has passed away one of the most familiar figures of East Lauderdale and one of the best men in our county; a worthy and honorable citizen. He is survived by his wife and a number of children. Mr. Butler was a man of strong character, and filled a leading position among his neighbors, among whom he was justly held in high esteem. Though advanced in years he possessed a robust physique, and up to the attack that carried him away he was hale and strong, discharging actively the duties of life. In his death the family have the warm sympathy of a large circle of friends.
(From "Cemeteries of East Lauderdale County, AL" Published by Friends of the Rogersville Public Library 1996: Butler Cemetery: Butler, Chisholm, Feb 20, 1822 - Sept 15, 1895. Butler, Mary A., wife of C., Dec 30, 1822 - May 21, 1901. Lauderdale County Marriage Records - Chism Butler to Mary Ann Paine Aug 18, 1839)

Obituary - Smotherman - James S. Smotherman was born July 20, 1816; died July 14, 1895. He was converted when a young man, and joined the Methodist church, living therein for 57 years, and a citizen of the county for 41 years. He was married to Miss Rebecca L. Stem, July 20th 1837, to which union followed several children, of whom most all are living. Brother Smotherman was afflicted for several years with partial paralysis, which rendered him unfit to perform the work so obligatory upon him. He was a man to look after the interests of the church, and the preacher, as he was a member and a trustee of Ebenezer church, Lexington circuit. I visited him often with great pleasure as his theme was to glorify our Lord and Redeemer. Three days ere his demise he clapped his hands, and shouted, "I’m coming Home!" Here was found a home for the preachers, as he was always glad to see them and would urge their coming again. And truly, we say, a good man has fallen, and may we rejoice that he has gone to a rest prepared for the people of God. His wife survives him, though in feeble health. Wm. Walker, Green Hill, Ala.

 

October 19, 1900 Florence Times

 

News from Whitehead, Alabama Oct 9, 1900
Miss Lizzie Harvey died at the home of her brother, Mr. R. W. Harvey, a few days ago. She was a good Christian woman and will be greatly missed in the neighborhood in which she lived. We extend our heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved family.

 

December 21, 1900 Florence Times

 

Mr. Sherrod White, one of Lauderdale’s oldest citizens, died at his home at White’s Mill, in East Lauderdale, on Tuesday last. He was about 80 years old. He was a good man, a worthy citizen, who was held in high esteem by his community.
(From "Cemeteries of East Lauderdale County, AL" Published by Friends of the Rogersville Public Library 1996: Barkley Cemetery: White, Sherwood, May 9, 1818 - Dec 16, 1900. White, Jane, Aug 5, 1819 - Dec 17, 1884. Lauderdale County Marriage Records: Sherwood White to Jane Harvey Sept 1837)

 

A Mrs. Phillips, living near the Pump Factory, died on Tuesday, at an advanced age, and was interred here Wednesday.

Brother Stewart Wylie born in Lauderdale Co. S.....1847, professed faith in ...united with the Methodist....in 1866, of which he lived ....tent member until 1898,.... became dissatisfied with....tism, and joined the M...Baptist church at Winsb... where he has lived since....til April 19, 1900, when ... count of ill health, he ca.... to Lauderdale Co., to be....brothers and sister. .......married to Mrs. Florence......Winsboro, La., in 1887; she preceded him in death 2.... Brother Wylie was a ... that dreadful disease cons... from which he was an inten.... er, but bore his suffering.... patience and ided in full.... of a living faith,... hav... Dec 15, 1900. Brother.... leaves 3 brothers and 2 sis.......

 

May 24, 1901 Florence Times

 

The Valley of Death --- Three Aged Citizens Pass Away This Week
During the past week three old and well known citizens of Lauderdale have gone to that bourne whence no traveler returns - Mr. W.C. Phillips, Mr. John W. Lovelace, and Mrs. Chisholm Butler - all of whom had passed the allotted term of life and had lived to a ripe old age.


Mr. W.C. Phillips, of Centre Star, died on Saturday night last, at the age of probably over 90 years. He was a venerable patriarch, a good man and worthy citizen, who leaves a large family, the larger number of whom now live in Texas. His wife survives him.


On Tuesday morning, Mr. John W. Lovelace passed away after a brief illness. He was stricken with paralysis on Saturday night and lingered only until Tuesday. Mr. Lovelace lived about 7 miles northwest of the city, and was a frequent visitor to Florence where he was well and favorably known. He had passed the 70th mile post in his life, yet up to a few days before his death was in the active pursuit of his business affairs.


On Tuesday morning, at her home near Centre Star, Mrs. Chisholm Butler died suddenly and without warning to her family. She had greeted a friend who had just entered her home, and complaining of sudden illness, sank to the floor and expired. Mrs. Butler was the mother of David, James, William and Gabe Butler, all well known citizens of our county. She had lived to an advanced age, and manifested through her long life the best traits of her sex.
(From "Cemeteries of East Lauderdale County, AL" Published by Friends of the Rogersville Public Library 1996: Butler Cemetery: Butler, Mary A., wife of C., Dec 30, 1822 - May 21, 1901. Butler, Chisholm, Feb 20, 1822 - Sept 15, 1895. Lauderdale County Marriage Records - Chism Butler to Mary Ann Paine Aug 18, 1839)

 

Death of Miss Lutie Johnson


The Tuscumbia correspondent of the commercial Appeal dated Monday last, makes the following announcement: "Miss Lutie Johnson, eldest daughter of Mrs. Kate M. Johnson, of this city, died at the home of her mother in this place last..." (did not copy the rest of this obituary).

 

February 12, 1902 Florence Times

 

In Memory - On January 3, 1912, the death angel again visited this vicinity and claimed for its victim, Mr. T. H. Campbell, aged 67. He leaves a wife and seven children and a host of relatives and friends to mourn his death. He belongs to the M. E. Church and was a good Christian. He was sick two years and his sufferings were great, but he has gone to a happy home where there will never be any more sickness, sorrow and pain. He is gone but not forgotten; he can’t come to us, but we can go to him. Weep not, dear friends, but so live that we may meet him on that happy shining shore. Written by a little girl, Dulus White


(From "Cemeteries of East Lauderdale County, AL" Published by Friends of the Rogersville Public Library 1996: Barkley Cemetery, Campbell, Thomas H., Jan 1, 1845 - Jan 3, 1912. Pvt Co A 53 Tenn Inf CSA. Campbell, Jemma, wife of T.H., Dec 27, 1850 - Apr 13, 1918. Lauderdale County Marriage Records: T.H. Campbell to Jemima White, Feb 7, 1871)

 

January 29, 1909 Florence Times

 

The three year old child of Mr. J. W. McDonald died Monday morning at the home of the parents, near the Thoele-Phillips stove foundry.

 

Col. H. L. Lay, a citizen widely known in East Lauderdale, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Andrew Grisham, near Whitehead, on Thursday of last week, aged (85) years. (Pulaski Co. KY Marriage Records: Harrison Lay to Susan Woolsey, 1839. Conway Co. AR Marriage Records: Harrison Lay to Nancy Weathers Donaldson 1865. Lauderdale County Marriage Records: Harrison Lay to Betty McCartney 1882.)

 

Dec 31, 1915 Florence Times

 

Mr. Tom Kennedy, a prominent farmer living near Lock One died Wednesday, having been taken ill suddenly only a few days before. The interment took place yesterday under the supervision of the Fielder undertaking establishment at the Butler graveyard. Mr. Kennedy is survived by his widow and nine children.


(From "Cemeteries of East Lauderdale County, AL" Published by Friends of the Rogersville Public Library 1996: Butler Cemetery at Lock I: Kennedy, Thomas L., Oct 23, 1871 - Dec 29, 1915. Also: Kennedy, M. Danie, wife of T. L., Apr 21, 1874, Oct 18, 1931. Lauderdale County Marriage Records: T. L. Kennedy to M.D. Powers Sept 26, 1892.)

(beginning of obituary not copied) Mrs. Jesse G. W. Leftwich lived for many years in Florence, where she was held in the highest esteem for her many, noble traits of character. A faithful mother in Israel, true to her family, her friend and her church, she won and retained a host of friends who sincerely mourn her death. The Birmingham News in recording her death says:


"Mrs. Leftwich had been in bad health for about two years. In her death Birmingham lost one of its oldest and best known citizens. She is survived by six daughters, Mrs. F. M. Hargrove and W. M. Provost of Mobile, Mrs. John C. Carmichael, Mrs. J. Seymour Perkins, Mrs. Angus Leftwich and Mrs. Horace S. Hall of Birmingham, and two sons, Jesse Bion Leftwich and George A. Leftwich of Mobile.


"Although born in Ohio, Mrs. Leftwich has spent practically her entire life in Alabama, having moved to Florence when she was nine years old. She was married in 1853 to Jesse G. W. Leftwich. During the second year of the war Mrs. Leftwich and her husband refugeed to Tuscaloosa, for (where?) they lived for 25 years.


"In addition to her children, Mrs. Leftwich is survived by the following grandchildren living in Birmingham: Alan Jemison, Sterling W. Provost, Mrs. Driver Fulton, Mrs. D.S. Lassiter, Miss Jesse Mae Perkins, Robt. C. Perkins; two nieces, Mrs. Turner C. Brown and Mrs. Emma C. Vaughn; a nephew, Sterling A. Wood, and a sister, Mrs. Hattie Davenport."

Emma Bradley, a worthy colored woman living in North Florence, the wife of Allen Bradley, died Monday, and was buried Tuesday, when a large congregation attended the funeral as a mark of respect.

 

April 19, 1918 Florence Times

 

Mr. Silas E. Templeton was called over near Athens Friday to conduct the burial services of Mrs. J. Crite Rogers, known to many at this place.

 

Since last report from this place, Mrs. Fannie Fulks, one of the most loved women of Rogersville, has been called on her journey to that other country. Her husband went on fourteen years or more ago; he was for many years the pastor of the Presbyterian Church here.


(From "Cemeteries of East Lauderdale County, AL" Published by Friends of the Rogersville Public Library 1996: Liberty Cemetery, Fulks, Rev. J.T., Jan 15, 1848, Feb 16, 1904. Fulks, Fannie L. Weaver, wife of J.T., Nov 1, 1850 - Apr 3, 1918)

Prof. and Mrs. Robert Hudson were called to Rogersville last week from their studies at University, to be at the bedside of Mrs. Hudson’s mother, Mrs. Jemima Campbell, at her home a few miles out near Mt. Bethel Church. Mrs. Campbell’s death occurred Saturday and burial Sunday near Blue Water on the Florence Road. The bereaved have the sympathy of the entire community.


(From "Cemeteries of East Lauderdale County, AL" Published by Friends of the Rogersville Public Library 1996: Barkley Cemetery, Campbell, Jemma, wife of T. H., Dec 27, 1850 - Apr 13, 1918. Thomas H., Jan 1, 1845 - Jan 3, 1912. Pvt Co A 53 Tenn Inf CSA. Lauderdale County Marriage Records: T. H. Campbell to Jemima White, Feb 7, 1871)

The following selected obituaries were contributed 25 Mar 2008 by Judith M. Miller

 

Florence Herald. 6 Aug 1896

Death of Mr. Carroll Sharp
     Mr. Carroll Sharp, a well known citizen of Waterloo, died Saturday of congestion. Mr. Sharpe was well known in the county and a prosperous farmer.

Death of Edward McPeters
     Mr. Edward McPeters, the 16 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Jas. McPeters, died last Thursday morning of malarial fever, after an illness of six weeks. The funeral services were held at the Christian church Thursday evening, and the interment being in the city cemetery. Mr. McPeters was a well known and popular young man whose untimely death is greatly deplored by many friends. 

Florence Herald, 20 Aug 1896

Miss Emma Bramlett 
Her Spirit Tooks Its Flight Early Tuesday Morning
     Miss Emma Bramlett died a an early hour Tuesday morning at the home of Mrs. J. J. McDavid.
     Miss Bramlett was a sister of Dr. W. M. Bramlett, one of the leading physicians of this city. She had been in Florence for a year or more and had made a great many warm friends, who are deeply grieved at her untimely death.
     Miss Bramlett’s death was very unexpected. She was seriously ill but one day before her death, which resulted from congestion.
     The funeral occurred Monday afternoon at 5 o’clock and was largely attended. The interment was in this city, services being held by Rev. J.W. Shoemaker, D.D. at the Methodist church.
     The sympathy of many friend will be extended to Dr. Bramlett in his great sorrow.

From County News…
     A Fatal Accident – an adopted daughter of Mr. C.H. Allen of Lexington, fell from a mule one day last week and sustained injuries from which she died in a short while.

Florence Herald, 3 Sept 1896

Mrs. F.W. Carroll Dead 
     At Gravelly Springs, Ala., early on the morning of August 24, after a lingering illness of many months, Mrs. F.W. Carroll, a daughter of Elijah G and Rachel Chandler, entered into rest. A husband and children, as well as many near relatives and friends mourn her loss.

Florence Times, Saturday, 6 July 1896

KILLED IN COLBERT
Wesley McWilliams Kills a Colored Corn-Stealer
Tuscumbia, June 29 – Mr. Wesley McWilliams, a well to do farmer, living near town, shot and killed Charles Bolling, a colored farmer, living on an adjacent farm. McWilliams a few days ago, opened a corn crib which he had not been using and found that it had been robbed of forty or fifty bushels of corn, the thief taking it from the back side of the crib through a crack which he had closely covered over.


     McWilliams had been sitting up watching since and this morning about 2 o’clock the thief put in an appearance and began to sack the corn. Upon being accosted, he turned with an upraised club upon McWilliams, who emptied the contents of his shotgun into his abdomen.


     McWilliams came to town and gave himself up, and was acquitted upon preliminary examination. Bolling had plenty of corn of his own raising and was considered a good negro.

Death of Mr. Edward H. Price


     Mr. Edward H Price, formerly of Florence, died at the home of his mothers, Mrs.. Wm. T. Price, in Nashville, on Monday last and the remains were interred in the cemetery at Florence on Tuesday. Mr. Price had been confined to his home since last January with consumption and gradually his strength wasted away until last Monday when the end peacefully came. The remains were conveyed here on Teusday, and were accompanied by Mrs. Price nad Messrs Oscar and Sam Price and Rev. J. W. Cherry, the pastor of the family. Funeral services were held at the Methodist church at 1 o’clock, conducted by Mr. Cherry, assisted by Rev. W.F. Andrews.


     The deceased is kindly remembered by all of our people and the announcement of his death evoked many expressions of sorrow. He possessed unusual ability, and in business circles sustained a high sense of honor and integrity, and was very popular. He was about 35 years old. In his death the family have the sincere sympathy of a large circle of riends. Peace to his ashes.

Florence Times, 24 Aug 1895

DISTRESSING SUICIDE
A Prominent Citizen of Colbert Cuts His Throat
Mr. Elmore Abernathy Seeks Surcease of Sorrow in Death.
     Most distressing intelligence comes to us from our sister county of Colbert.


Mr. Elmore Abernathy, a prominent and well known citizen, living about nine miles east of Tuscumbia on Wednesday night last died by his own hand, cutting his throat with a razor and dying alone in his yard.
    

Mr. Abernathy had been in poor health for some time past and this condition was aggravated and intensified by the illness of his child, with which the father and mother had been sitting up for successive nights previously. On the night of the distressing occurrence, Mr. Abernathy left his wife, who thought nothing of his absence at first but becoming alarmed at its continuance, she went to look for him, fearing he had become faint from weakness and anxiety; and found him near the residence, with his head almost severed from his body, a razor grasped in his hand, and dead! The agony of the distressed wife may be better imagined that described. Assistance was immediately summoned and his relatives in Tuscumbia sent for. These, with the coroner and others, passed through Sheffield to the stricken household about 6 o’clock Thursday morning. The discovery of the deed occurred about 5 o’clock Thursday morning.
    

Mr. Abernathy was the son of the late Dr. Robert Abernathy and brother of Mr. Tracey Abernathy of Tuscumbia, and was widely known. He was also well known in Florence, and was a genial and popular gentleman. His death was a great shock to his friends here. He was about 25 years of age.

Death at Oakland
Robert McIntyre, son of Mr. John McIntyre died near Oakland on Sunday morning last at 5 o’clock and on Sunday afternoon his remains were interred in the Duncan graveyard. The cause of death was fever. Rev. Charles Hines conducted the funeral services which were attended by a large congregation of all classes. Mr. McIntyre was 29 years of age, and was highly esteemed in his community. He was a worthy, popular young citizen and will be much missed by a large circle of devoted friends.

Florence Times, Aug 31 1895

OBITUARY
CROW: Thomas B. Crow was born Feb 18, 1814 and died April 26, 1895. He was twice married. The first time to Miss M.E. Young, April 7, 1845. This union was blessed with six children, of whom five are living. He was left without a wife April 28, 1873, her spirit taking its flight to the land of rest. Again, December 24th 1873 he was married to Mrs. Mary J. Shouldar, who survives him. Brother Crow was identified with the M.E. Church South at Ebeneazer, Lexington circuit, where he had gone in and out, helping to do the work assigned him, as he had been for a goodly number of years trustee and steward. We think his Christian life dated back a half century. He was a man of great firmness, very emphatic in his expressions, and truly conscientious. He was prop and sure support of the church which he loved, and his house was the preacher’s home. Uncle Tommie, as he was called, left his mark, as he was a true man to his friends, and a citizen of unimpeachable integrity. I was to see him often before and during his sickness, and he bore it with patience, resigning to the will of God. The last time I talked with him he emphasized that man should first “seek God and his righteousness.” The path of the just shineth more and more unto the perfect day. 
     William Walker.

Florence Times, 7 Sept 1895

Death of Mrs. Nellie Green.
     Mrs. Nellie Green, wife of the venerable Leonard Green, and mother of our townsman, Mr. Allen Green, died at her home, near Lexington, on Sunday morning last at the advanced age of 77 years. Mrs. Green had been in poor health for about six years, during which time she was a great sufferer, though her faith at all times in the peach of the future life was undimmed. She had for 55 years been a member of the Methodist church, and during that long time she exemplified in the highest degree the duties of the true Christian. She was a North Carolinian by birth, and had moved to this State in 1860, accompanied by her husband and ten children, all of whom exempting two survive her.
     The funeral took place at the home on Monday, conducted by Rev. Wm Walker, and attended by a large congregation, after which the remains were interred in the family cemetery.

Florence Times, 14 Sept 1895

Excerpts from the obituary of Lucinda Catherine Webb
     Mrs. Lucinda Catherine Webb was born November 7, 1830. She was married to Rev. William J. Webb, who has been a faithful Free Will Baptist preacher for 27 years or more. They were joined together in matrimony August 11, 1847. This union was blessed with eleven children, forty-one grandchildren and four great-grandchldren…
     …She was very anxious about her children who had not been converted – some in the Indian territory and some in Texas...

Excerpts from Letter from Oakland 14 Sept 1895
     …Returning from Waterloo, our hears were saddened to learn of the deaths of Mr. Mason Whitten, Robt. McIntire and the little infant child of F.P. Hall. Last Wednesday we were called to attend the funeral of Mrs. John McIntire, whose sudden death occurred on Tuesday…

Excerpts from History of the Town and County Briefly Told
     …On Friday evening last a child of Mr. and Mrs. Perry A. Philips died in East Florence, aged about one year…
…The infant son of MR. and Mrs. R.T. Simpson Jr after a brief life of a few hours, died on Monday morning last, and was interred in the city cemetery on Tuesday…

SUDDEN DEATH NEAR ROGERSVILLE
     Mr. John Muse, an old citizen living near Rogersville, died suddenly at his home on Thursday of last week, aged 87 years. He retired in his usual health on Wednesday night, and early Thursday morning his wife noticed that he was not well, and on making investigation, found him seriously ill. He died within a few minutes after she was aroused. Mr. Muse was a worthy man and had been a member of the Missionary Baptist church over sixty years. He was the father of our townsman, Mr. John W. Muse.

Florence Times, 21 Sept 1895

Excerpts from North Alabama Our Neighbors Across the River
     …Mrs. Steenson, widow of the late Samuel Steenson, died at the home of her son, Mr. A.L. Steenson, near South Florence, on Monday last week…

Excerpts from Obituary
     Mason Whitten, born January 8th, 1831, and died August 23rd, 1895. He joined the Methodist church in 1878 in which he lived a good and faithful Christian until death. He was confined to his bed four long months, during which time he never spoke above a whisper. His suffering was severe, but he never was heard to murmur or complain; but in his low whisper … He leaves a wife, two children and many friends to mourn his lossl. He was loved by everybody who knew him.

Obituary.
James S. Smotherman was born July 20, 1816; died July 14, 1895. He was converted when a young man, and joined the Methodist church, living therein for 57 years and a citizen of the county for 41 years. He was married to Miss Rebecca L. Stem July 20, 1837 to which union followed several children, of whom most all are living. Brother Smotherman was afflicted for several years with partial paralysis, which rendered him unfit to perform the work so obligatory upon him. He was a man to look after the interests of the church, and the preachers, as he was a member and trustee of Ebenezer church, Lexington circuit. I visited him often with great pleasure and his theme was to glorify our Lord and Redeemer. Three days ere his demise he clapped his hands, and shouted, “I’m Going HOME!” Here was found a home for the preachers as he was always glad to see them and would urge their coming again. And truly, we say, a good man has fallen, and may re rejoice that he has gone to a rest prepared for the people of God. His wife survives him, though in feeble health. Wm Walker. Greenhill.

CHISHOLM BUTLER, SR.
This well known citizen passes away.
     Mr. Chisholm Butler, Sr., one of the oldest and most widely known citizens of our county, died at his home near Centre Star on Sunday night last, aged about 75 years. The cause of his death was an affection of the brain – congestion or brain fever – and his sickness was of short duration, only eight or ten days.
     Thus has passed away one of the most familiar figures of East Lauderdale and one of the best men in our country; a worthy and honorable citizen. He is survived by his wife and a number of children. Mr. Butler was a man of stong character, and filled a leading position among his neighbors, among whom he was justly held in high esteem. Though advanced in years he possessed a robust physique and up to the attack that carried him away he was hale and strong, discharging actively the duties of life. In his death the family have the warm sympathy of a large circle of friends.

The Venerable Minister Gone to His Reward
     Rev. W.C. Beavers, for many years a resident of East Lauderdale, where he ministered in spiritual things to the people, on Sunday morning last peacefully passed to his reward, aged 54 years. He had been ill for several months past and when his summons came it was not unexpected. His wife and only child, Mrs. Lowe, of this county survive him. Mr. Beavers was a native of Lawrence county, in this state, and came to Lauderdale about 15 years ago. He was of the Cumberland Presbyterian faith and had charges at different points in the county, though latterly his chief labor was with his church at Centre Star. His home, where his late days were spent was in northeastern portion of the county. This man of God served his generation well. Entirely devoid of ostentation, he pursued the even tenor of his way, faithful in every duty and always ready to respond to the cause of the church and ever willing to lend his aid in any good cause. He was a strong, logical speaker, a genial gentleman, and will be greatly missed. He was a worthy member of the Masonic fraternity, who assisted in the solemn funeral rites. A good man has fallen on eternal sleep. Peace to his ashes.

Florence Times, 28 Sept 1895

Excerpt from News of our Neighbors Across the River


     …A colored man named Jackson was burned almost to death last Friday evening at the Colbert Iron Company’s furnace at Sheffield. Red hot cinders burst on him and his clothes were burnt off of him; his lower limbs from his waist down were so badly burned that the skin peeled off in large pieces, and his hands and arms as well as his back is frightfully burned…


     …Henry King, locally known as “Blind Henry,” died at Courtland one day last week after boasting of his capacity and drinking three pints of whiskey…


     …Last Sunday morning a man named B.F. Trammell, who lived on the old Ricks place on the mountain four miles south of town was found lying dead in the road a short distant beyond his house, his left hand clasping his chin and his right, holding a rope with which he had lead a yoke of cattle out to pasture a short time before. He had just talked to Mrs. Smith who was milking her cows near by just a little while before, and she said he made no complaint of any ailment or illness. He was a hard working man about sixty years old and leaves quite a large family.

Obituary
     Died near Waterloo, Ala., August 30th 1895, at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. M. M. Wilson, Mrs. Lucinda Hays. She was born on June 25th 1810. Her maiden name was Cantrell. She was first married to Canney Coburn, by whom she had seven children, all of whom preceded her. The last was Mrs. Seletha Holleman, wife of W. M. Holleman, who died December 11th 1894. By her last husband, Wallis Hays, there were no children. She was buried at Wesley Chapel near her son John Coburn. She was a Baptist for many years, but had recently joined the Methodist church, to which her children belonged. We hope she now is with them in the church triumphant.  WMH

Mr. R. F. Rikard Dead
     Mr. R. F. Rikard, one of the most worthy citizens of our town, died on Tuesday morning last, at his home at Stewart’s Spring, after a long illness of consumption, aged 53 years. Mr. Rikard had been confined to his home six or eight months, and when the final summons came it was no surprise to his friends. He was a good man, who will be much missed by a large circle of friends. He was a faithful and consistent member of the Baptist church and was a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity.

Death at Haddock
     Cleveland Hooten, son of Mr. T. B. Hooten, a well known citizen of West Lauderdale, died at Haddock on Wednesday of last week, in teh12th year of his age, the cause of death being congestion of the brain. Cleveland was a bright boy and dutiful son, and his untimely death falls with distressing force upon his family.

Florence Times, 5 Oct 1895

Excerpts from News of our Neighbors Across the River
     …Mrs. Chitwood, wife of Judge W. P. Chitwood, died at Tuscumbia on Sunday the 22nd after an illness of two weeks. In speaking of her death, the Standard says she “was a lady of fine intellectual attainments and noble Christian character” whose “death is deeply deplored by a large circle of friends.” Judge Chitwood and his family have the sincere sympathy of a large number of friends in this city in their irrerparable loss….
     …Mr. L.H. Gassaway, living near Sheffield, died on the 20, from congestive chill after a few hours’ illness. He was 84 years old…

Died from His Wounds
     Mr. John Dalzell, who some weeks ago had his arm badly crushed by the cars of the L&N road, and who had suffered intensely since, died at his mother’s home in East Florence on Monday morning last.

Death of Russell Houston: A brother of Governor Houston joins the great majority
     A dispatch from Louisville, dated the first instant, gives the following account of the death of a brother of the late Gov Geo. S. Houston and the late Miss Mary Houston, who died in this county recently:


     Russell Houston, a chief attorney for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad Company, died at 10:15 o’clock tonight, principally from the infirmities of old age, superinduced by asthma.


     “Judge” Houston, as he was universally known, was born Jan 10, 1810 in Williamson Co., TN, being the son of David and Hannah Houston, of a leading southern family. He was educated at the Nashville University for Law. In October 1862, he was elected director of the Louisville and Nashville Company and until October 1868 was a director.
    

He was the fourth president of the company in 188 and in 1867-68 was vice-president. In October 1868 he was elected chief attorney of the company, which he held continuously since, though for four or five years his position has been an advisory one, being too old for active work. Mr. Houston married Miss Grizelda Polk, at Columbia Tenn June 4, 1844.

Excerpt from History of the Town and County, Briefly Told
     …Mrs. Phillips, wife of Mr. Robert W. Phillips, proprietor of the City Meat Market, died of congestion at her home on North Court Street, on Monday night. Her remains were entered in Cypress Cemetery.

 

Died from his Wounds
     Mr. John Dalzell, who some weeks ago had his arm badly crushed by the cars of the L&N Road, and who had suffered intensely since, died at his mother’s home in East Florence on Monday morning last.

Florence Times, 12 October 1895

STABBED TO DEATH
Lazarus Burks with a Knife takes the life of Jim Thompson
 - a Tragedy with three Characters in One Act.
The officers brought down Lazarus Burks Tuesday and placed him in Jail. Yesterday when a TIMES reported visited the jail to interview Burks he failed to draw but a meager account of the fracas from the prisoner.
    

It appears that the difficulty took place on Monday night; that a daughter of Burks is responsible for the trouble.
    

Some previous trouble had been created between Thompson and Burks, and, if the TIMES is correctly informed, when Thompson visited the home of Burks – about four miles northwest of Rogersville, on Monday the daughter of Burks either by persuasion or of her own free will followed Thompson off. This, when discovered by the young woman’s father, enraged him to such an extent that the pursuit was close on to the couple and resulted in the death of Thompson in a way above mentioned.
    

We have not been able to get the verdict of the coroner’s jury.
     Burks is securely awaiting a trial; and whether he will be found guilt of murder will be known later. The preliminary trial will take place at the court house today, Saturday.

Obituary
     Mrs. Ellen Green, wife of Leonard P. Green, was born June 20, 1819, and died Sept 1, 1895 at her home in Lauderdale county, Al. She was for 55 years a member of the Methodist church, to which she gave her life. She was a true follower of the Lord; patient, faithful and obedient to the impress of the Holy Spirit; and during her sickness she would thank God, that she was ready to go, then passed away her pure spirit to the land of the blessed. In the death of “Aunt Ellen,” Green’s Chapel has lost one of the brightest stars which has so long illuminated the pathway of others; the community has lost a true and faithful friend; the children an affectionate mother and the husband a devoted companion. And while we mourn with her relatives and friends, yet we rejoice that some sweet day, we shall see her again. Let us be ready for the summons.

Florence Times, 19 October 1895

Obituary
     At the residence of Elder T. W. Young, of Hope community, Mrs. Cinthia P. Young, wife of Elder T. W. Young, breathed her last about 2 o’clock Sunday morning, October 13, 1895. She had been a sufferer for many years, but was apparently better for the past few months until about a week before her deaths he was taken with a chill followed by a fever and other diseases, which proved fatal.
    

Mrs. Young was about sixty years of age, having been a member of the Christian church for about twenty years. She was truly a Christian woman and a model for us all – ever letting her deeds and kindness and works of love and comfort open the way to many sad hearts.
    

Yes, we can truly say she was a good wife, a kind daughter and a humble Christian. She leaves a husband, a mother, a brother, a sister and many friends to follow on.
    

While we sympathize with them in their bereavement we sorrow not as those who have no hope, for we can say of her, “she has passed from death unto life.” She now res from her labors while her works do follow. Let us all imitate her example and be prepared to meet her in the “sweet bye and bye.” LU

Dr. Benjamin F Gross, a native of Lauderdale but for many years a citizen of Decatur, died in that city on Wednesday last aged 61 years.

SELF DEFENSE
Burks Acquitted of the Murder of Thompson
     The trial of Lazarus Burks on the charge of killing James Thompson, near Whitehead, last Sunday, account of which THE TIMES gave last week, was held by Judge Hendry D. Smith last Saturday and resulted in the discharge of Burks.
    

The facts of the case are about as follows: Thompson on Sunday, the 6th, went to Burk’s home, under the influence of liquor, and told the former he had come for a row. Burks came outside his yard and was badly beaten by Thompson. He retreated into his yard and was again attacked by Thompson, who had him on the ground beating him. Burks’ wife and daughter came to his rescue and the latter knocked Thompson off her father with a stick. Burks and his wife and daughter then started to go to Thompson’s brother’s house to get the latter to take his brother away. Thompson followed them and again made an attack, when Burks cut him in a number of places in the breast, abdomen and arm. Thompson died in a few hours. The case attracted much attention and a number of East Lauderdale people were on hand at the trial. Col Jno D Weeden appeared as attorney for Burks and Paul Hodges, Esq for the State. On hearing the evidence Esq Smith promptly discharged. Burks.

Florence Times 26 October 1895

Excerpt from News of Our Neighbors Across the River
     …A horrible accident occurred at McWilliams’ gin-mill near Tuscumbia on Monday of last week. Mr. Y. B. Hicks, aged about 26 years, was caught between the bar and the line shaft and hurled around at a terrible speed. His head was thrown against the floor with every revolution and was horribly mangled. His head knocked a hole in the floor, which was made of seasoned pine lumber. Hicks was well respected by all who new him and was a young man of good habits.

Excerpt from History of the Town and County Briefly Told
     …John Pettus, a worthy and well known colored man living on the headwaters of Sweetwater, died on Saturday last…

Death of Mr. J. W. Brooks
     Mr. Jesse W. Brooks, of Centre Star, one of the most universally esteemed citizens of our county, peacefully passed away on Sunday evening last, after an illness of many weeks. His health began to fail in the early spring and gradually declined until the time mentioned, when surrounded by his family and friends, the venerable and beloved patriarch, in the full faith of his fathers, committed his soul to God. A good man has gone – a man whose long life constitutes a heritage of uprightness and honor sacred to those whom he has left behind. Mr. Brooks was 67 years old, and was for many years a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. He was conscious up to the hour of dissolution, and met death calmly and triumphantly. His wife and seven children, two daughters and five sons, survive him.
     His remains were interred in the city cemetery, the services being conducted by Rev. J. T. Fulks of Rogersville. The pall-bearers, selected as old personal friend were Messrs. R. L. Bliss, A. C. Chisholm, R. T. Simpson, A. D. Coffee, Jas. R. Price, B. B. Shane, J. C. Conner and R. N. Coffee.

Florence Times, 9 Nov 1895

From History of the Town and County briefly told….
     Jack Richardson, a young man about 20 years of age, who lived in the St. Florian neighborhood, was on Tuesday last adjudged a lunatic after examination by Dr. W. M. Price. The unfortunate man had been married only a few weeks. He was sent to the State asylum….

 

Smothered to Death
     A few days ago, the three year old child, a little girl, of Mr. and Mrs. William Pruitt, who lived near Pruitton, was smothered to death in cotton. The children were playing in a pile of seed cotton and had made a hole in it. The older children then left, when the unfortunate child fell into the hold head foremost and the cotton closed in around her. The parents were both away temporarily. When found the child was dead.

Two Old Citizens Dead
     Two citizens well known throughout the Western portion of Lauderdale passed away on Monday last – Dr. John White and Mr. Robert Ransom, both of Second Creek, north of Waterloo and near the State line.
    

Dr. White, who was about 60 years old, had lived in that community all his life and was regarded as a very useful citizen. He leaves no near relatives, his wife having preceded him to the grave. He had a wide acquaintance and will be much missed.
    

Mr. Ransom was a native of Franklin county, but had lived in Lauderdale about 10 years. He was about 75 years of age at the time of his death and leaves a wife and several grown children, among whom are James , Bell and Lindsey Ransom, well known citizens of that section. His remains were taken to Franklin county for interment.

Florence Times, 16 Nov 1895

Excerpt from In Memory of J. W. Brooks
“Death comes to young men but old men go to death.” 
     On Sunday night, Oct 28th 1895 at 20 minutes past 8 o’clock, it pleased God to summon J. W. Brooks of centre Star, Ala, to “come up higher.” In early manhood he became a Christian and joined the Cumberland Presbyterian church. He was a firm, devoted Christian, served as ruling elder and clerk of session in Centre Star congregation for a great number of years. He never shrank from duty, but always did cheerfully what the Master bid him do. As a church member, Sabbath school superintendent, leader of prayer meetings, honorary member of Missionary Society, he was true and trustworthy. As a friend and neighbor, kind and generous. No man in the community stood higher in regard to integrity than he; so quiet and unassuming; yet under his reserved demeanor there flowed a current of strong and trusting faith in God. He was devoted to his wife, loving and gentle to his children and faithful to his church. Oh, he was so mild, so good; making sunshine wherever he went with loving words for all; and down deep in his heart was that Christ-like sympathy that prompted him to render aid to the suffering and needy. It is sad to give up a good man; but he is still here, living and acting through his influence – an influence that shall last until angels declare that “time shall be no more.” ……

Death of Mrs. Howell
     Mrs. Bessie Howell, wife of Mr. Teb Howell and sister of Dr. A. H and Mr. B. F. Powers, died at her home on Court Street at 4 o’clock on Thursday morning, after a brief illness. The funeral took place on Thursday afternoon from the First Methodist Church, Rev W. F. Andrews conducting the service, after which the remains were laid to rest in our city cemetery. The death of this good woman has brought sorrow to many hearts. Though unostentatious and unassuming in manner, she nobly performed all the duties of life, frequently making sacrifices in the discharge of her duties to the churches. To her immediate family the blow is indeed severe; to all who knew her intelligence her death will be received with sincere sorrow. Her husband and three children survive her.

Florence Times, 23 Nov 1895

From History of the Town and County Briefly Told…
     …Mr. Dock Cannady, a worthy citizen of East Lauderdale, died at his home on Cowpen Creek on the 10th instant of consumption, age about 70 years. His wife preceeded him to the grave a year ago….


     …The Florence friends of Mrs. M. L. Frierson and family will extend to them heart-felt sympathy and condolences in their deep afflictions through which they have recently passed in the death of Miss Louise and sickness in the family, an account of which we print elsewhere in our paper today…

At Rest
     On Thursday night between the hours of 8 and 9 o’clock, Mrs. Sarah C. Sloss, widow of the late Capt. Thos. M. Sloss, and a daughter of Gen and Mrs. S. D. Weakley, after a long illness of consumption, passed peacefully to eternal rest at the home of her parents in this city. The announcement of her death will carry sorrow to many sympathetic hearts. A noble, Christian lady has gone from among us, and the sad event will recall to many of our people the admirable traits of character that distinguished her life. A devoted and faithful member of the Catholic church, a dutiful daughter, wife and mother; a ministering spirit in the sick room, modest and unassuming in manner, she fulfilled in the highest degree the exalted sphere of womanly character; and the memory of her pure and unselfish life will linger as a cherished heritage with those who knew and loved her. Her husband and three children have preceded her to the grave and one son survives her.
     A noble woman has gone to her reward. May her spirit rest in peace.

Died in Texas
     Died, at his residence in Whitewright, Texas, E. Irwin Roach, on November 4th, 1895, of typhoid fever,. Mr. Roach was a son of Edmond and Margaret Roach and a brother of W. G. Roach; was born and reared in Lauderdale county; married Miss Lizzie Austin, daughter of Mr. F. M. Austin of Threet, Ala., and in January 1894 moved with his family to Texas where he resided until the time of his death. Mr. Roach was a consistent member of the Baptist church and tried to live up to the duty of a noble Christian man. May the blessings of friends rest upon his wife and two little children, as well as the aged mother and other relatives.

Thos. Peden Dead
     Mr. Thomas H Peden, one of the most widely known citizens of East Lauderdale, died at his home near Lock 6 on Monday last, of pneumonia, after an illness of one week. It had only been a short time before that Mr. Peden was in our city looking unusually well, and the announcement of his death was therefore a great surprise to his friends.

An Aged Citizen Gone.
     Mr. John McMurtry, one of Lauderdale’s oldest citizens, died at the home of his son, on Cowpen Creek, on Tuesday night last at the advanced age of 83 years. He had been sick some weeks, but up to his attack he was in robust health for hone of his years. He had been a resident of the community in which he died for a period of 60 years and always maintained the respect and esteem of the people. He was an upright citizen and a good man.

Florence Times, November 30 1895

Three Deaths! Distressing Fate of a Lauderdale Family in Texas
     Last week The Times announced the death of Mr. E. I. Roach which occurred at Whitewright, Texas, of typhoid fever, on the 4th instant. Since then his widow and oldest child, a son three years old, have died, both passing away on the same day from the same disease that killed the father. One member only of the family survives, a babe of eight months. Mr. and Mrs. Roach were both natives of Lauderdale, having left here for Texas only two or three years ago. Their many friends in their old home will be shocked to hear of the sad fate that has befallen them.

Florence Times, 7 Dec 1895

From History of the Town and County Briefly Told….
     …Mr. Cash Riley was killed on Cowpen Creek on Friday last by a tree falling upon him. His son and Mr. Wm Richardson cut the tree down and its fall was unobserved by the unfortunate man who was engaged in gathering up the brush…

Death
     Miss Dora E Armstrong, daughter of Mrs. Alice Armstrong, who lives in the residence on the southwest corner of Court and Tuscaloosa streets, died on Saturday evening last and her remains were interred in the city cemetery on Monday afternoon, Rev J.H. Lacy conducting the funeral from the Presbyterian church. The cause of death was fever. Mrs. Armstrong came South from Illinois a short time ago for the benefit of the health of her children, who are delicate. She has the sympathy of our people in her sad bereavement.

Florence Times, 14 Dec 1895

Death of Mr. W. H. Key
     On last Saturday evening, Mr. William H. Key, one of the oldest citizens of our county, died at the residence of his son-in-law, Mr. James Murdock, of South Florence.


     Mr. Key was born in Sussex County, Virginia in December 1819, but removed when very young, perhaps 70 years ago, with his parents to Alabama. For many years before the war, he was one of our largest and most successful planters. Since the close of the struggle between the states, which brought to him, in common with all our people, terrible financial loss, he has worked manfully, diversifying his crops and using improved implements, and leaves a place in capital condition. Though always taking an active interest in politics and public affairs, he never sought nor accepted any public position.


     Mr. Key was a man of fine mind, excellent business qualifications, great energy and force of character, warm hearted, generous and social in disposition, courtly in manners, a typical gentleman of the old Southern school.
    

At a comparatively young age, he married Miss Susan Boddie, one of Lauderdale’s noblest daughters, who was, until her lamented death a few years ago, to him indeed a helpmeet and counselor. He leaves four daughters, Mrs. Dr. Conner, Mrs. Dr. Watson and Mrs. Bettie Stewart of this city, and Mrs. Murdock of Colbert; and one son Mr. W. H. Key Jr., of St. Louis. Several winters ago he had a severe attack of la grippe, from which he never fully rallied, and lately has sunk rapidly.


     On Sunday evening his remains were interred in our cemetery after appropriate services at the Presbyterian church, by Re. J. H. Lacy.


     One by one, our old landmarks are passing away.

Death of Miss America Burtwell
     The many friends of Miss America Burtwell will be pained to hear of her death, which sad event occurred at Nashville on Thursday of last week, of consumption. Miss Burtwell was the daughter of the late Col John T. Burtwell of this city and niece of our townsman Mr. James Burtwell. She was a lady of most amiable and lovely character, whose untimely death will be deeply deplored by a large circle of relatives and friends.

Death Near Waterloo
     Mrs. Melton, widow of the late Tine Melton, died at her home near Waterloo on Monday last, of typhoid pneumonia; aged about 50 years. Seven children survive her.

Florence Times, December 21, 1895

Sad Accident – a child burned to death
     On Thursday of last week, a lovely child, the five-year-old daughter of Mr. Richard Gibbs, near Haddock in West Lauderdale, was burned to death. At the time, both parents were away, the mother being gone to the spring near by and the father at work, and before they could respond to her cries, she was so badly burned as to be past human relief. After suffering great agony death came to her relief the succeeding day.

Death of Mrs. Mary Garner
     Mrs. Mary Garner, mother of our townsman Mr. Bayless B Garner, died at the home of her daughter Mrs. E.H. Hanna at Oxana, Ala on Friday morning of last week the 13th of pneumonia after all illness of about two weeks. On Saturday afternoon her remains were brought to Florence, and on Sunday morning after services in the Methodist church, conducted by Ref. W.F. Andrews, were laid to rest in our city cemetery.


     Thus having passed away after a long life of usefulness, one of the best of women. In all the relations of life she exemplified in the highest degree the noblest traits of her sex. At her funeral were present her five sons, all grown to manhood, and worthy sons of worthy parents, filling well responsible positions in life.


     Mrs. Mary Garner, born in Lauderdale county, November 9th 1822 and died Friday morning, December 13, 1895 in the 72nd year of her age. Her maiden name was Miss Mary Martin. She was married to Mr. Peter R. Garner Dec 8, 1845, just 50 years ago, and is the mother of ten children, all of whom survive her, save two, who died in infancy. Mrs. Garner professed faith in Christ in her twelfth year and connected herself with the Southern Methodist church, of which she was a consistent member for nearly 60 years, at the time of her death. As she grew older, she grew more Christlike and died trusting in the Lord.

Florence Times 28 Dec 1895

Death of Wm Lambert
     Mr. William Lambert, one of our citizens whom all our native Florentines knew well, died at his home in the northern portion of the city on Christmas morning, after a brief illness of consumption. His sudden death will be a sad surprise to his friends, who only a few days before saw him on our streets, strong and well. He leaves a wife to mourn his premature death.

Death of Miss Annie Milner
     Miss Annie Milner, second daughter of Mrs. Joseph Milner, died at the home of her mother in this city on Saturday last at noon, after a long and painful illness of consumption. On Sunday, after services in the Presbyterian church, conducted by her pastor, Rev. J. H. Lacy, the remains were laid to rest in the city cemetery. Thus has passed away one of the noblest and best-loved ladies; a true Christian, firm in her faith, amiable and lovely in character, and abundant in good work. Until disease restricted her labors there was no service of her church or in the pure and better walks of society that she did not cheerfully perform, and her sad, untimely death has left many hearts to mourn. In their service bereavement the family have the sincere sympathy of all our community.

Florence Times, 11 January 1896

Death
     Mrs. McBee, mother of Mrs. J. W. Sommer, died at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sommer, on Poplar Street, this (Friday) morning, at 4 o’clock, after a brief illness of less than two days, of congestion. Mrs. McBee has four sons living in distant states and those that could be reached by wire have been informed of the sad event. The funeral will take place at the residence tomorrow (Saturday) afternoon, at 2 o’clock.

From Short local Items – History of the Town and County Briefly told.
     … Miss Bobbie, the young daughter of Mr. H Belew, near Lexington, died on the 27th of December after an illness extending over some months. She was a bright and intelligent child and her death was a severe blow to a large circle of relatives and friends. She was 12 years of age.

Florence Times, 25 Jan 1896

From SHORT LOCAL ITEMS…
     … Mrs. Martha Williams of Centre Star, after an illness extending over many months, departed this life on the 30th of December last, aged about 65 years. She was the mother of Messrs J. W., W. C. and J. N. Williams of that neighborhood….
     …The infant son of Dr. J.M. Peerson, one moth old, died on Thursday last.
     …Old aunt Patsey Leach one of our most worthy colored women, living in the western part of the city, died Thursday morning, aged about 78 years.

Florence Times, 1 Feb 1896

Death of Mrs. J. P. Graham
     Mrs. Graham, wife of Capt J. P. Graham, conductor on the Florence branch of the M&C Railroad, died suddenly at the home of her husband on Cherry street, in this city, on Sunday morning last. Mrs. Graham had been in delicate health a long time but the immediate cause of death was shock from a fall on Friday night previously. After a brief prayer service at the home on Sunday afternoon conducted by Rev. W.F. Andrews, the remains on Sunday night were carried to Huntsville and after funeral services by Rev. Messers Andrews and Branscomb were laid to eternal rest. The cortege was accompanied to Huntsville by Rev. Mr. Andrews, Miss Berta Kendrick, Mr and Mrs W.J. Bosley. Capt Graham and his son have the sympathy of many friends in their sadness.

Obituary
     The home of Dr. J. M. Pearson was visited by the death angel last Thursday afternoon. Their infant Son, James Darby, was born Dec 17th 1895, and died Jan 23, 1896. He just budded on earth to bloom in heaven. The Lord just lent him to them for one month and six days and then took back his own. The hearts of a home are saddened over a wilted flower, but the angels of heaven rejoice to receive another sweet, living flower into the garden of God. A little mound of resh dirt on the hill above the house makes the last resting place of the sweet babe, while its spirit basks in the sunlight of God. – J.W. Cowan.

Death Near St. Florian
     Mrs. Saletha Smotherman, a well known lady living near St. Florian, died suddenly of heart failure on the 22nd instant, age 56 years. Mrs. Smotherman was a daughter of the late Col Jo Huff and a sister of Mrs. J. S. Tate of St. Florian.

Florence Times 8 Feb 1896

Deaths
     Miss Sallie Garrett, daughter of Mr. Lafayette Garrett, died at the home of her father, three miles east of the city, on Sunday morning last, aged 18 years.
     The infant daughter of Mr. Gaines Swinnea died in East Florence last Sunday morning, of pneumonia, aged four months.
     Mrs. Nellie Harmon, of Sheffield, who has many relatives and acquaintance in this city, was crushed to death by the cards in that city on Friday morning last. She was crossing the tracks near the furnaces when an engine run over her, producing instant death. Her remains were interred in the Florence cemetery on Friday last.

Death of Mrs. D. C. Wesson
     Mrs. D. C. Wesson, wife of a well-known citizen of East Florence, died on Wednesday night at 1 o’clock after a painful sickness of several weeks. Mrs. Wesson was a daughter of Mr. Love Blackburn and was a most worthy lady. In his sad loss, Mr. Wesson has the sympathy of many friends.

Florence Times, 15 Feb 1896

In Memoriam
     Threet, Al Feb 4 1896 Editor Times: On the 23 ultimo, the death angel visited the house of Mr. and Mrs. Wm Hall Koonce and snatched from their fond embrace little Stella Myrtle, who had been their household idol for about 10 months, she having been born on March 7th 1895. Little Stella was a sweet, pretty blue eyed little creature, admired by all who knew her, and babe fair to develop into a fine beautiful girl, but alas, the bud was never permitted to bloom into a rose while in this world of sin; but was transplanted in another clime, where God will transform her into angelic form. The providence of God to short-sighted mankind is very mysterious and man is soon lost in his own thoughts when he begins to study it but He is alwise and his purpose in all He does is for the best. But as long as man is mortal it will be natural for parents to grieve for their loved ones and sympathy and condolence at such times seem almost like mockery. But we lall acknowledge the wisdom of God and feel it our duty to bow to His decrees. Little Stella, sweet and fair, gone where sickness is no more.
     May it be our happy lot to meet her on that happy golden shore. – A friend.

Florence Times, 15 Feb 1896

From Short local Items…
     …The measles prevails extensively in the Centre Star neighborhood, and in some cases in violent form. In the family of Mr. W.P Butler eight persons (all the family except Mr. Butler) were down in bed the early part of the week. One of Mr. Butler’s children, four years old, died of the disease during the week….

Last of a Large Family
     We are sorry to learn that Mr. Robt H Thompson is lying seriously ill at his home at Mars Hill and is given up as hopeless by his physician. His disease is consumption from which both his parents and seven brothers and sisters have died. He is the last of a large family, destroyed by this fell disease, against which science has found no remedy.
     --- Since the above was put in type intelligence has been received of the death of Mr. Thompson, which occurred on Wednesday night. He leaves a wife and four small children, who in their distressing loss have the heartfelt sympathy of a large circle of friends.

Dead
     Willie Steen, son of Mr. John F Steen, of Centre Star, died on Thursday of last week, aged 12 years. Willie was stricken with paralysis early last year, from which he never recovered. His parents have the sympathy of many friends in their sad lost.

Florence Times, 22 Feb 1896

Mrs. B. A. Lawton Dead
     Mrs. B.A. Lawton, who several weeks ago was taken to New York for special medical treatment, died in that city on Tuesday night of last week. Her husband had been summoned to her beside and left here on the night of her death to join her. When Mrs. Lawton left for New York, in charge of Dr. P.S. Boyd, the doctors held out but little hope that she would recover. Her friends here have received the intelligence of her death with sincere sorrow.

Florence Times, 29 Feb 1896

Memoriam
     How many certainties are there in life? Only one – death. The most important thing about it is uncertain – the time, when, death calls for all ages, but how blessed and peaceful it makes that hour if one is ready.
     These thoughts are suggested by the peaceful, happy and as we would say, untimely death of that bright robust looking young daughter of Mr. D Lafayette Garrett, Miss Sallie S Garrett, only 22 years of age, and the week before the very picture of health, contented and happy in her enjoyment of a bright hope in Jesus, of an everlasting life with him. Nor was this home in any sense a delusion, for it stayed her in every day life and made it a ray of sunshine in her home and to everyone who knew her, but it showed the brightest when put to the crucial test in the hour of dissolution. It was then that her faith and character reflected the image of her Savior like the molten gold does the face of the refiner.
     In her right mind she called her loved ones around her and bade them farewell, with a message for each and talked calmly of the dear ones she was going to meet so very soon in the other shore.
     She first united with the Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church in August 1890 and was transferred to the Florence church last summer.
     A life and death like this is an irrefutable fact of the reality and genuineness of the Christina religion and the Promises of God. – her pastor.

In Memoriam
     According to the will of our Master, on Thursday morning, the 6th instant about 1 o’clock, Mrs. Annie Wesson, the wife of Mr. Cogar Wesson and daughter of Mr. and Mrs Lovie Blackburn, left this world of sin and sorrow and has gone to that beautiful mansion far beyond the sky. She was 28 years old and joined the Christian church at Mars Hill when she was young and tried to live right. When death struck her she put her arms around her husband’s neck and said she felt that she was prepared and willing to go, and for him to raise the children the best he could. She was loved and esteemed by all who knew her and was always ready to attend to all duties when called upon. Her death left a void in our hearts which never can be filled. We extend to the bereaved family our heart felt sympathy and trust that in time the Master, who doth all things well, will comfort their aching hearts.

Death of Etta Christopher.
     The Lord has plucked one of earth’s most beautiful flowers. Etta, in the early part of her sickness, prayed to go to sleep and never awake again; her prayers were answered Saturday night near 11 o’clock, Feb 15, 1896. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Christopher of Lexington. She was my schoolmate and also my classmate. She was loved by her schoolmates and friends; she would have made a useful woman. She applied for the Union school for this summer. “The Lord giveth and the Lord taketh; blessed be the name of the Lord.” We extend to the bereaved family our heart-felt sympathy and trust that in time the Master, who doth all things well, will comfort their aching hearts. Schoolmate and friend – Etta Tod Lexington Ala Feb 22 1896

Florence Times, 29 Feb 1896

Instantly Killed
Fatal Accident near Green Hill
     On Monday last at the saw mill of Mr. Pascal Kennedy a few miles from Green Hill, on Cow Pen Creek, a man named Harvey Lifan (LaFan) was instantly killed. Whilst the mill was in motion by some means a piece of timber was thrown violently around, striking Mr. Lifan (LaFan) on the back of the head, and breaking his neck. He died instantly. He was about 30 years of age and unmarried.

From Short Local Items…..
     …Nannie Flakes, wife of John Flakes a worthy colored woman of this city died on Friday of last week…
     … A young daughter of Mrs. Millsburn Robinson, near Wright, died on Monday last, aged about 6 years, of congestion of the brain. This is the second child Mr. Robinson has lost within the past month or two…
     … Miss Jimmie Akers, sister of Mrs. A.J. Smith, died in this city on Saturday afternoon last, after a long illness caused from a fall. She was xxx years old and her premature death is a sad one indeed. After funeral services conducted in the Christian church on Sunday afternoon, her remains were interred in the city cemetery.

Florence Times, 7 March 1896

After Life’s Fitful Fever
     Clarence Johnson, a young man living near the Spathite furnace, after a long illness of consumption, quietly breathed his last on Monday morning. He was alone so far as his kinsmen were concerned; but the good people of the city looked after his wants and thoughtfully cared for him. On Tuesday, after religious service conducted by Rev. W.F. Andrews, (who had been specially interested in his welfare) he was interred in the city cemetery.

     Mr. Harvey Lifan (LeFan), whose violent death at Pruitton was noticed in THE TIMES last week, leaves a wife and two children. It was a sad event truly.

Dreadful Accident
A child Scalded to Death
     On Friday evening last the young son of Mr. and Mrs. Alex Matheny of the eastern part of the city, was scalded to death in a horrible manner. On the evening mentioned, while Mrs. Matheny was preparing supper, the child, Omie, drank from the spout of the coffee pot, a quantity of hot coffee. Its death followed about 1 o’clock the same night. The afflicted family have the sympathy of many friends in their sore loss. 

Dropped Dead
     One day last week, Mr. James Asbell, a young man about 21 years of age, while helping to haul logs on the Simpson farm, near Pruitton, injured himself internally by heavy lifting, and dropped dead. He complained that he was hurt and started home near by, and had proceeded not more than forty or fifty yard, when he suddenly fell and expired. He was a step-son of Mr. Jas. P. Pusson of that neighborhood and was a worthy young man.

Thrown from a Wagon and Killed
Tuscumbia, Ala., March 3 1896
Editor Times: As Ben Berry, a thrifty farmer and a good citizen, was returning home from Leighton last Saturday with several boys in the wagon with him, his wagon ran into a ditch and pitched him out head foremost, and the wagon wheel run over him, causing injuries from which he died that night. He leaves a wife and one child. He has friends in your county who will be sorry to hear of his sad death – correspondent.

Florence Times, 14 Mar 1896

Death Roll
The Grim Reaper’s Work in Lauderdale
     On Saturday last the 7th Mr. W.T. Tidwell, son of Mr. Richard Tidwell, died near Atlas of Pneumonia, after an illness of only six days. He was about 16 years of age and was a very worthy young man. His remains were interred on Sunday in the family cemetery on the home place in presence of a large congregation.
     Mrs. Peden, wife of Mr. Haywood Peden, died at her home near Atlas last week.
     Mr. Irvine Ross, an old and well known citizen living in the Atlas neighborhood, who had reached the advanced age of three score and ten, departed this life on Sunday last. He had been a cripple almost from his youth up, though he was twice married. He is survived by a wife and one child.
     Mrs. R. F. Edwards, sister of our townsman Mr. S. P. Rice and wife of the late Rev W. B. Edwards (of the M.E. Church South) died at the home of her brother in this city on the 26th of February in the 74th year of her age. She had been in declining health for a year o more. She had been a member of the Methodist church over 50 years and was a most exemplary Christian lady. She was the last but one of a family of seven children. Her remains were interred in the Walton cemetery near Oakland.
     Mr. George Lovelace, a worthy citizen of the Oakland beat, died a couple of weeks ago. He was a good citizen and his death is lamented by many friends in that locality.
     Col B. F. Chisholm, a native of Lauderdale, died at Chisholm, Texas on last Sunday morning. He grew from boyhood to manhood in the Green Hill settlement, where he spent many years of his life. He moved to the Lone Star State in 1867. He was a good and useful citizen and died at the ripe old age of 76 years. His old Lauderdale friends will hear of his death with sorrow. He was a man of fine character. Peace to his ashes.
     Miss Saide Brittain, daughter of Mr. Wash Brittain died on Thursday morning at her home near the M&C depot, of pneumonia, aged about 40 years. Miss Brittain had been in ill health a long time. She was a worthy lady who had much to contend with in life, and after its fitful fever she had doubtless entered into eternal rest.
     Mr. Wm L Oliver a well known citizen of Rogersville beat, died on Sunday last, aged 76. He was a good man and stood high in the esteem of his neighbors.
     Maj Benjamin Franklin Stine of Tuscumbia died on the 28th of February aged 67 years. He was widely known throughout North Alabama.

Florence Times, 28 March 1896

Died in Texas
     Mr. Jesse Goode, brother of our townsman, Mr. Thomas Goode, and of Messers Joseph and Charles Goode of East Lauderdale, died at Greenville Texas on the 16th instant, of inflammatory rheumatism, aged about 40 years. He leaves a wife and five children. Mr. Goode left Lauderdale about twelve years ago.